DIY Coloring Placemat

Crafts ’n things Craft of the Day

Keep little ones entertained at the Thanksgiving table with a coloring placemat made at home in just minutes!

Materials

  • American Crafts Cardstock: Vanilla, Dark Kraft

Tools

  • Silhouette CAMEO Electronic Cutting Machine and Sketch Pens
  • Silhouette Shapes: Pumpkin and Hay Scene (#12988), Grass Border (#39667)
  • Paper adhesive

Directions

Size

12”x12”

DYI Coloring Placemat

1. Using Silhouette Studio software, create placemat design. Place scalloped border around design.

2. Load CAMEO with sketch pen and Vanilla cardstock.

3. In Studio software, select all portions of design except scalloped border. Open the cut settings window, choose Silhouette Sketch Pen and click cut. When complete, replace pen with cutting blade. Do not unload mat.

4. In Studio software, select scalloped border. Click cut. When panel is cut, remove from CAMEO and adhere to Dark Kraft cardstock.

Tip

by Jeana Goodwin for Silhouette America (blog.silhouetteamerica.com)

Turkey Treat Box

Crafts ’n things Craft of the Day

Fall party guests will smile when they see this adorable treat box filled with candy!

Materials

  • Cardstock: American Crafts Chestnut, Cranberry, Mustard; Simple Stories SNAP Color Vibe Yellow Dot/Chevron
  • Self-adhesive black enamel dots

Tools

  • Silhouette CAMEO Electronic Cutting Machine and Turkey Pillow Box Shape
  • Adhesive runner or adhesive of choice

Basic Supplies

paper trimmer, computer

Directions

Size

4″x5″

Turkey Treat Box

1. Gather supplies. Trim cardstock as follows: Chestnut, 6-1/2”x7”; Chevron, 4”x3-3/4”; Cranberry, 2”x2”; Mustard, 2”x2”.

2. Place papers on Silhouette Cutting Mat as shown and load into CAMEO.

3. Open Silhouette Studio software on computer. Ungroup Turkey Pillow Box Shape parts and move each piece to correspond with the placement of papers on the mat in Step 2.

4. Choose the “cardstock” setting in Silhouette Studio and click cut. Remove papers from CAMEO when complete.

5. Assemble pillow box, adhering side flap closed and folding along dotted lines to create top and bottom. Adhere chevron tail feathers to back. Adhere facial features to front and lightly flip up edges of chest “feathers”.

6. Fill with treats.

Tip

  • Googly eyes can be used in place of enamel dots, if desired

by Jeana Goodwin for Silhouette America (blog.silhouetteamerica.com)

Turkey Treat Holder

Crafts ’n things Craft of the Day

 

Making this fun-and-easy Turkey Treat Holder not only gets the kids involved with Thanksgiving preparations, but it can keep them busy while dinner is cooking.

Materials

  • Recycled toilet paper roll
  • Cardstock: brown, gold, orange, red, tan
  • Wiggle eyes, two
  • Ribbon, 6” length
  • Gold paper fastener

Tools

  • Red chalk
  • Hole punch
  • Pinking shears or decorative-edge scissors
  • Aleene’s Original Tacky Glue

Basic Supplies

scissors, ruler

Directions

STEP 1

Print and cut out pattern. Use pinking shears to trim feathers.

STEP 2

Cut and adhere tan paper to cover toilet paper roll. Let dry. Adhere feet on circle and circle on bottom of toilet paper roll.

STEP 3

Adhere eyes, beak, and wattle on turkey. Use red chalk to lightly blush cheeks.

STEP 4

Measure and cut 6” ribbon length. Tie ribbon around body below face.

STEP 5

Use hole punch to punch hole on end of each feather. Insert paper fastener through holes on feathers. Adhere feathers on back of body.

by Linda Valentino

Cork Turkeys

Crafts ’n things Craft of the Day

 

With Thanksgiving just around the corner, these place cards are a fun and simple way for kids to help with the Thanksgiving Day celebration!

Materials

  • Recycled corks
  • Craft foam: orange, red
  • White paper, scrap
  • Chenille stems, three for each turkey: orange, tan, brown, yellow, or red
  • Wiggle eyes, two for each turkey
  • Toothpick

Tools

  • Aleene’s Original Tacky Glue

Basic Supplies

pencil, black marker, scissors, ruler, tape

Directions

Size

Size is approximately 3″ tall.

Note

Instructions are for one cork turkey. Repeat to create as many as needed.

Turkey

1. Print and cut out patterns. Adhere beak, wattle, and eyes on top of cork.

2. For feathers, cut three chenille stems in half. Coil each chenille stem around pencil. Use toothpick to poke six holes in back of cork. Push ends of chenille stems in holes.

3. For tag, measure and cut 1-1/2”x2” white paper rectangle. Use black marker to write name and draw outline on tag. Tape tag on end of toothpick. Insert toothpick in cork.

by Linda Valentino

Helping Hands Apron

Crafts ’n things Craft of the Day

 

Won’t the chef for Thanksgiving Day dinner absolutely love this apron? Kids and adults can make these together, using their own hand prints as patterns!

 

Materials

  • Canvas aprons: adult-size tan, child-size orange
  • Delta Ceramcoat Acrylic Paints: Adobe Red, Cinnamon, Spice Brown, White, Terra Cotta, Raw Sienna, Espresso, Barn Red;
  • Delta Ceramcoat Textile Medium
  • Embellishment ideas: assorted sequins, bugle beads, seed beads, rick rack trim, ribbon, glitter

Tools

  • Sewing needle and black thread

Basic Supplies

scissors, black marker, tracing paper, white copy paper, paintbrush and sponge scrap

Directions

STEP 1

Trace hand print, with fingers together and thumb extended, onto white paper. Outline each hand print with black marker. Trace hand prints onto tracing paper and transfer onto aprons.

STEP 2

Follow manufacturer’s instructions to mix textile medium with paint. Sponge paint turkeys and small rectangles (legs) Spice Brown. Let dry

STEP 3

Print and cut out pattern. Transfer details onto turkeys

STEP 4

Paint heads with mixture of Adobe Red + Cinnamon (4:1). Paint feet and beaks Terra Cotta.

STEP 5

Paint feathers White, Black, Terra Cotta and Adobe Red + Cinnamon (4:1) mixture. See photo for guide. Lightly highlight feathers Barn Red.

STEP 6

Paint wings White, Raw Sienna, Espresso and mixture of Adobe Red + Cinnamon (4:1). Highlight wings Barn Red. Paint wattle Barn Red. Let dry. Outline feathers and details with marker.

STEP 7

Sew beads onto heads for eyes or dot eyes with marker.

STEP 8

Attach sequins, beads, or trims as desired.

by Meggan Maravich

Thanksgiving Gratitude Journal

Can you believe that Thanksgiving is a little over a week away? Alice Golden with you today to share a holiday tradition that we have been doing with our family and friends for several years now. We started with a simple tradition of passing around a small notebook where each person could write a few lines about something for which they were grateful. As the number of guests expanded, it didn’t take long to run out of room in the original journal and I started looking for a new solution.

Three years ago, I came across a digital kit that seemed like it would work well for what I had in mind. I didn’t have much time to spend creating a journal from scratch and needed something that I could pull together easily. (Did I mention that it was the day before Thanksgiving and we were expecting 30 people for dinner… or that sometimes I have a tendency to procrastinate?)

These turned out better than I had hoped and have already become a new tradition for our family and friends. Here are the journals from Thanksgiving 2010 and 2011.

Let me show you what I did. First, blank journaling cards were printed onto an assortment of cardstock. I used digital software to slightly change some of the colors, but the kit also comes with pdf versions of the journaling cards that don’t require any special software, just a computer and printer.

I found an empty box and covered the outside and inside with Thanksgiving-themed papers. I added ribbon around the middle to dress it up a bit. Blank journaling cards and several archival pens were placed inside the box, all ready for our guests to arrive.

To create the label, I die cut one of the journaling elements that came with the kit and added it to an embossed paper frame from my stash.

The first year, I put my eight- and nine-year-old nieces in charge of asking each guest to fill out a journaling card. The cards were placed back in the box as they were completed. In the whirlwind of activity surrounding getting dinner on the table, I forgot all about taking each person’s photo until dessert was over and folks were starting to leave. Being in such a rush resulted in most of the photos looking like police mug shots.

Some lessons I’ve learned after doing this for a few years:

- If you are hosting Thanksgiving, put someone else in charge of asking guests to create a journaling card (this can be a perfect job for older kids).

- Not everyone will want to participate – and that’s okay. Some people like to write their own card and others prefer to create one per family or couple. Just keep note of how the cards are filled out so you can get corresponding photos.

- Ask someone to be in charge of making sure each person, couple, or group has their picture taken to correspond with how the journaling cards were completed.

- Make previous years’ journals easily accessible to guests so that they will be able to look through them. Not only do they love reminiscing about holiday memories, but I have found they also become more willing to participate in the project going forward.

When you are ready to assemble your journal, all you need to do is to print your photos, trim to size, and adhere them to the completed cards.

Punch a hole in the corner of each card and use a metal binder ring to hold them together. I added a seasonal charm, as well as a cover page with a title and the year.

I love having all these wonderful memories together in one book. This is my dad in 2010.

And here is the book from last year.

Supplies:

Cathy Zielske’s Thankful Album Project No. 02 from DesignerDigitals.com
Assorted cardstock
Thanksgiving-themed papers from Karen Foster Design
Autumn Charms from Karen Foster Design
Ribbon from May Arts
Nestabilities Labels One Die from Spellbinders

So glad you stopped by the Crafts ‘n things blog today. Hope you have a wonderful Thanksgiving!

Alice Golden from Golden Moments (www.alicegolden.com)